libraryresearchThis week we had to choose a theme for an APA formatted annotated bibliography. Since my course project will involve the instruction and assessment of students’ library skills using educational technologies I searched for related articles that I may be able to use in my project. We were asked to prepare a citation list of ten articles and provide annotations for five of them. I have posted both the citation list and the annotated bibliography below. I also posted a citation list I compiled for my ETEC500 class on educational technology in libraries. These two sets of articles will provide some great resources for my ETEC648 project.


Library Skills Assessment – A Citation List

Amekudzi, A. A., Li, L., & Meyer, M. (2010). Cultivating research and information skills in civil engineering undergraduate students. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice, 136(1), 24–29. doi: 10.1061/(ASCE)1052-3928(2010)136:1(24)

Andrews, T., & Patil, R. (2007). Information literacy for first-year students: an embedded curriculum approach. European Journal of Engineering Education, 32(3), 253–259. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.1080/03043790701276205

Colorado State Dept. of Education, D. S. L. and A. E. O. (1996). Rubrics for the Assessment of Information Literacy. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=ED40189

Dobozy, E., & Gross, J. (2010). Pushing library information to first-year students: an exploratory study of faculty/library collaboration. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 41(2), 90–99. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com.mms02.cerritos.edu:2048/toc/uarl20/current

Edwards, V. A. (2007). Formative assessment in the high school IMC. Knowledge Quest, 35(5), 50–53. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/aboutkq/aboutkq.cfm

Kayongo, J., & Helm, C. (2010). Graduate students and the library: a survey of research practices and library use at the university of Notre Dame. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 49(4), 341–349. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/rusa/communications/rusqinfo

Kunkel, L. R., & Weaver, S. M. (1996). What do they know?: an assessment of undergraduate library skills. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 22(6), 430. Retrieved from http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/00991333

Lohmiller, D. (2012). Teach and assess library skills in 30 minutes (or Less). Library Media Connection, 30(4), 52–53. Retrieved from http://www.librarymediaconnection.com/lmc/

Poinier, S., & Alevy, J. (2010). Our instruction does matter! Data collected from students’ works cited speaks volumes. Teacher Librarian, 37(3), 38–39. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Torrence, M., Powers, A., & Owczarek, L. (2012). Research rescue: The USF Tampa library enhances library instruction. Florida Libraries, 55(2), 31–37. Retrieved from http://www.flalib.org/publications/florida_libraries/


Library Skills Assessment – An Annotated Bibliography 

1.
Amekudzi, A. A., Li, L., & Meyer, M. (2010). Cultivating research and information skills in civil engineering undergraduate students. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice, 136(1), 24–29. doi: 10.1061/(ASCE)1052-3928(2010)136:1(24)

The ASCE’s body of knowledge for the 21st century and vision for civil engineering in 2025 outline skills and capabilities necessary for civil engineers to create a sustainable world. An undergraduate course at Georgia Institute of Technology introduces undergraduates to a systems-sustainability approach to civil and environmental engineering, applying systems methods to analyze decisions over the life cycle of large-scale civil-engineered facilities. This paper discusses voluntary and systematic improvements introduced in the course over a 2-year period to develop research and information skills in the students. A workshop on information sources and skills was developed, offered and assessed over multiple semesters using a team-based course project. The term project requires students to select one or two large-scale civil-engineered facilities, evaluate them using the integrated systems-sustainability framework presented in the course, and develop a written report and oral presentation to present their work to their peers at the end of the semester. The paper discusses integration of the information and library skills workshops with the course and presents results that underscore the importance of formerly cultivating research and information skills in civil engineering undergraduate students.

This is an interesting article that outlines how Georgia Tech librarians worked with teaching faculty to cultivate information and research skills by incorporating skills exercises into the course content and also by offering hands-on workshops and online tutorials. There are many ideas for presenting the information and assessing the success of the lessons.

2.
Andrews, T., & Patil, R. (2007). Information literacy for first-year students: an embedded curriculum approach. European Journal of Engineering Education, 32(3), 253–259. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.1080/03043790701276205

The ability to access, evaluate and synthesise high-quality research material is the backbone of critical thinking in academic and professional contexts for Engineers and Industrial Designers. This is the premise upon which teaching and library staff developed Information Literacy (IL) components in Engineering & Industrial Design Practice–a first-year unit of study in the School of Engineering at the University of Western Sydney. This paper documents the IL teaching and learning experience and evaluates and reflects upon how effective it was at helping students navigate their first tertiary level research tasks. It concludes that library sessions and assessment tasks were effective in introducing IL skills in concurrent development of critical thinking, based on feedback from library sessions, an online IL test, and assessment results.

This article focuses on the key information literacy skills and presents useful examples of how skills can be embedded into the curriculum of first year students with much success. Assessment tasks are outlined and results presented.

3.
Kayongo, J., & Helm, C. (2010). Graduate students and the library: a survey of research practices and library use at the university of Notre Dame. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 49(4), 341–349. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/rusa/communications/rusqinfo

This study sought to determine the extent to which the Hesburgh Libraries of the University of Notre Dame meets the needs of its graduate students. It focused on how Notre Dame graduate students found research materials and how useful the Hesburgh Libraries’ collections were in their research and studies. Information gathered through this project indicates the level of usefulness of library resources and collections for one of its main constituents—graduate students. Graduate students’ contacts with the library, regardless of method, were almost always for their own research pursuits, not for faculty research. Graduate students at Notre Dame had more limited contacts with librarians and with library outreach research services. Most respondents (62.8 percent) preferred to use remote access to obtain copies of electronic items identified as relevant to their research. Across the board, however, graduate students were generally satisfied with the various library services. The survey showed that 44.6 percent and 41.1 percent of the respondents rated the library as “very useful” and “useful,” respectively, in their research. The data collected has provided a better understanding of graduate student research behavior, methods of library access, and levels of satisfaction with library resources, which will inform local practices and has the potential to do the same at other institutions of higher learning nationwide.

Using a twenty question qualitative and quantitative survey the authors assessed graduate student’s relationship with and understanding of the library. The results are presented and the conclusions discussed. Methods of access to library resources are discussed and there is a case made for the need for more and alternative means of outreach and access including online and virtual. The questions used in this survey are good examples of the types of questions I might use in a similar survey.

4.
Lohmiller, D. (2012). Teach and assess library skills in 30 minutes (or Less). Library Media Connection, 30(4), 52–53. Retrieved from http://www.librarymediaconnection.com/lmc/

School librarians have always been teachers, even before the term “teacher-librarian” was coined. They teach every time they help students select books, locate and evaluate resources for research projects, or troubleshoot a computer problem. When they assist students, they explain and model the steps they are taking. Teaching for school librarians is a continuous, fluid process, dictated by the specific needs of individuals. To be consistent and efficient they teach whole class library lessons to reach all their students. Teaching requires assessment, however, which has always been a challenge in the library. Library assessments should be authentic assessments where students demonstrate their understanding of skills, yet the logistics of constructing, administering, and correcting them can be daunting. Performance assessments generally take longer to administer than worksheets, and time is a luxury in the library. Library schedules often prevent a lesson from spilling over into the next day. Both lesson and assessment must be completed in one class period or less. But by the time the classroom teacher takes attendance, focuses the students, leads them down the hall, and settles them into the library, the author is often left with 30 minutes (or less) for a lesson and checkout time. She feels rushed to teach the lesson, and even more rushed to have the students complete it. There is no time to allow for differentiation or to assist struggling students, or to accurately measure 30 individual performances. And when the library lesson is over, there is no accountability of what the students did or did not understand. In this article, the author describes a system that could quickly teach–and assess–each library skill to every student in the allotted time.

This article offers practical suggestions for teaching library skills to 6th graders both in print resources and online. Although not my target audience, there are several good tips here including a reminder about the need for a quick turn-around for assessments.

5.
Torrence, M., Powers, A., & Owczarek, L. (2012). Research rescue: The USF Tampa library enhances library instruction. Florida Libraries, 55(2), 31–37. Retrieved from http://www.flalib.org/publications/florida_libraries/

The article discusses the Research Rescue program at the University of South Florida Tampa Library, Florida. According to the authors, the program was created in an effort to implement new methods for providing information literacy and library research instruction through a virtual and live instruction of library services and resources for various academic subjects. A literature review, discussion on the project background, marketing and partnerships, and assessment is also presented.

This article will be useful to me because it provides a framework for librarians using instructional media. It describes and analyzes on-demand, virtual, and live sessions and addresses the need for consistent assessment of the services and a strong partnership with teaching faculty. Assessment tools are explained as are marketing and partnership opportunities and ideas.


Educational Technology and Libraries – A Citation List

Chih-Ming, C., & Sheng-Hui, H. (2014). Web-based reading annotation system withan attention-based self-regulated learning mechanism for promoting reading performance. British Journal of Educational Technology. 45(5), 959-980. doi:10.1111/bjet.12119.

Felvégi, E., & Matthew, K. I. (2012). eBooks and literacy in K–12 schools.Computers in the Schools. 29(1/2), 40-52. doi: 10.1080/07380569.2012.651421.

Frierson, E., & Virtue, A. (2013). Integrating academic library services directly Into classroom instruction through discovery tools. Computers in Libraries. 33(7), 4-9. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml

Hollandsworth, R., Dowdy, L., & Donovan, J. (2011). Digital citizenship in K-12: it takes a village. TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning. 55(4), 37-47. doi: 10.1007/s11528-011-0510-z.

Hyman, J., Moser, M., & Segala, L. (2014). Electronic reading and digital library technologies: understanding learner expectation and usage intent for mobile learning. Educational Technology Research & Development. 62(1), 35-52. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9330-5.

Kukulska-Hulme, A., Foster-Jones, J., Mallett, A. J. E. & Holland, D. (2004). Investigating digital video applications in distance learning. Journal of Educational Media. 29(2), 125-137. doi: 10.1080/1358165042000253294.

Little, S., Ferguson, R., & Rüger, S. (2012). Finding and reusing learning materials with multimedia similarity search and social networks. Technology, Pedagogy & Education. 21(2), 255-271. doi: 10.1080/1475939X.2012.698378.

McCrea, Bridget. (2014). 3 ways to build a digital content library. T H E Journal. 41(1), 18-21. Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/Home.aspx

Pei-Shan, T., Gwo-Jen, H., Chin-Chung, T., Chun-Ming, H., & Iwen, H. (2012) An electronic library-based learning environment for supporting web-based problem-solving activities. Journal of Educational Technology & Society. 15(4), 252-264. Retrieved from http://www.ifets.info/

Re-thinking learning spaces. (2013). Tech & Learning. 34(4), 18-20. Retrieved from http://www.techlearning.com/index

Russell, P., Ryder, G., Kerins, G., & Phelan, M. (2013). Creating, sharing and reusing learning objects to enhance information literacy. Journal of Information Literacy. 7(2), 60-79. doi: 10.11645/7.2.1744.

Russo, A., Watkins, J., & Groundwater-Smith, S. (2009). The impact of social media on informal learning in museums. Educational Media International. 46(2), 153-6. doi: 10.1080/09523980902933532.


Other Topics of Discussion This Week

Thoughts on a Project

Library Skills Activities and Assessment

I’d like to create a set of online library skills activities for students. (Or maybe just one or two to start with…) These activities would be available via the Cerritos College Library website and on each of our research guides. They would be self-administered, either at the recommendation of the librarian after a one-shot library orientation or on the student’s own initiative independent of an orientation. Students completing the activities would receive immediate feedback online. The assessment would enable the librarians to determine the information literacy competencies of the students and adjust our library instruction program as needed. I’ve been thinking about trying to do this at my library for a while but I don’t really know if it’s too complicated a project for this class project.

Skills Categories Include:

  • Develop topic
  • Identify potential sources
  • Develop, use, and revise search strategies
  • Evaluate sources and information
  • Recognize how to use information responsibly, ethically, and legally

There’s a free web-based assessment tool called TRAILS (Tool for Real Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) that features multiple-choice questions that target a variety of information literacy skills based various grade standards. I’ve looked at the 12th grade standard questions and they would be suitable for students at Cerritos College. The assessment items are based on the American Association of School Librarians’ Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and those from the Common Core State Standards Initiative that have been adopted by most states. The system was developed so that librarians can use and customize for their own library users. I’d like to be able to do this for Cerritos College.

 

 

 

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